• Cloud Forest Cafe

    Mon-Sat 8am-5pm, Sun 8:30am-6pm | 530.753.2164

  • There is a new toast in town

    Slide for today's specials

    Almond Butter & Banana Pecan Toast

    We all know peanut butter and banana pairs well; but we believe almond butter and banana were made for each other. Topped with pecans and honey, this savory toast will have you coming back for thirds.

    Avo Toast

    The ending of the summer season does not mean the end of delicious bites. Our fresh ingredients extends beyond our fresh juices, smoothies and paninis. Nothing encompasses summer better than a fresh plate of avocado toast. Let your tastebuds end the summer on a delicious note.

    Avo Salmon Toast

    Who says avo toast is limited to just avocado? Our salmon pairs well with avocado in more delightful ways than you can imagine. Try it for yourself.

    Water Lemon Freeze

    Ready for a refreshing slushie to cool down those Davis summer days? Introducing the Water Lemon Freeze- our summer special that is prepared to take you down a couple of degrees.

  • Brew It Up

    Our current locally-roasted coffee on brew (September 24, 2017)

    Guatemala

    Medium Roast

    The Cloud Forest Coffee Roasters impress with coffee beans acquired from Huehuetenango, Guatemala. With notes of chocolate, caramel, and graham crackers, you'll want this medium roast coffee to kick-start your day.

  • Slide for Menu

    Drinks | Breakfast | Lunch

    Drinks

    Espresso Drinks

    Summer Additions

    Water Lemon Freeze, Loca Mocha (blended), Vanilla Caramel Freeze, Salted Caramel Blend, Mint Espresso, Affogato

    Fall Additions

    Peppermint White Mocha, Mint Mocha, Mint Espresso, London Fog, Eggnog Latte, Pumpkin Spice Latte, Pumpkin Pie Latte, Cinnamon Vanilla Latte

    Juices

    Pink Lady (O+P+B+L), Davis Sunshine (O+C), Sunset (O+B), Beet & Carrot, Three Amigos (A+O+C)

    Smoothies

    Peach, Strawberry, Mango, Strawberry & Banana, Mixed Berry

    Iced Teas

    Arnold Palmer, Mango, Strawberry, Raspberry, Pomegranate, Lemonade

    SpecialTEAS

    Majaraja Chai Oolong Tea, Samurai Chai Mate Tea, Green Tea Latte

    Italian Sodas

    Strawberry, Mango, Watermelon, Cherry, Lemon, Lime, Orange

    Breakfast

    Pastries

    Croissants, scones, muffins, fresh baked cookies

    Yogurt Granola Fruit Cups

    Monkey Madness (Banana), Aggie Apple, Berry Blitz (raspberry/blueberry)

    Breakfast Paninis (served until 11:30am)

    #1 Onion & roasted peppers, egg w/pesto & pepper jack

    #2 Bacon, egg w/chipotle & cheddar

    #3 Sausage, egg w/chipotle & cheddar

    #4 Ham, egg w/chipotle & jack

    Dessert Paninis

    Strawberry Nutella, Banana Nutella, S'mores Nutella

    Lunch

    Paninis

    Cloud Forest: turkey, jack, pesto, mayo, avocado, spring mix, tomato

    The Villager: ham, provolone, pesto, mayo, red onion, spring mix, tomato

    Cache Creek Caliente: roast beef, swiss, homemade chipotle, red onion, spring mix, tomato

    Valley Veggie: provolone, pesto, avocado, red onion, peppers, cucumbers, spring mix, tomato

    Fresh Mozz: fresh mozzarella, drizzle of oil & balsamic vinegar, tomato, fresh basil, S&P

    Vegan Delight: vegan mozzarella, avocado, red onion, peppers, cucumbers, fresh basil, spring mix, tomato

    BLT: bacon, spring mix, tomato

    Special Roasted Eggplant & Fresh Mozzarella (weekends only): fresh mozzarella, red peppers, eggplant, spring mix, S&P

    Salads

    Served with herb Focaccia

    Cloud Forest Toss: spring mix, tomato, red onion, cucumbers, croutons tossed w/balsamic vinegar, olive oil topped w/mozzarella

    Cranberry Bleu Mix: spring mix, dried cranberries, homemade candied walnuts, bleu cheese tossed w/raspberry viniagrette

    Spring Mix Quinoa Salad: spring mix, quinoa, carrots, red onion, homemade candied walnuts , bleu cheese w/strawberry viniagrette

  • Come Say Hi!

    Location

    222 D St., Suite 10, Davis, CA 95616

    Right in the heart of downtown Davis. Walking distance from the University of California, Davis. Right down the street from the Davis Farmer's Market. Conveniently located adjacent and opposite of several hotels. Hot spot for students and locals to study and catch up!

    Hours

    Fall Hours

    Monday-Saturday 8am-6pm

    Sunday 8:30am-6pm

  • About Us

    Just a local business using local resourses to obtain fresh ingredients

    From the start, our commitment has been to offer the best food and drinks by means of fresh and locally-sourced ingredients. From our locally-roasted coffee beans to juices made from whole fruits and vegetables, we have achieved the most satisfaction by using simple ingredients that our customers can count on. As a trendy and artsy locale, even our coffee and espresso mugs have been handcrafted and customized to make you feel right at home.

     

    Fresh ingredients is our middle name: locally-roasted coffee beans (roasted only a few blocks away!); freshly-squeezed juices; smoothies made from real fruit; paninis built with ingredients prepared daily; and pastries from our local bakery (right down the street!)

  • Arts Corner

    Featuring Richard Simpson

    Richard Simpson

    Bob Dylan Series

           This series of Bob Dylan photographs was taken in 1964 at the Sacramento Memorial Auditorium, during a featured interview by Channel 10. Dylan was playing to a less than favorable audience because he was transitioning from folk to electric guitar.

    Richard Simpson

    Richard Simpson was born and raised on a Sierra Foothill cattle ranch in Northern California—property homesteaded by his great grandparents who had made the overland journey across the continent by Conestoga wagon in 1852.

     

    Richard Simpson’s lifelong passion for black-and-white still photography and the sense of the “Decisive Moment” began at an early age. He has produced an archive of thousands of photographs recording images from rural farm life, Bob Dylan, the Korean War, California’s Mendocino Coast and American River Canyons, Sacramento’s Skid Row to a portrait history of Native American Maidu Indians.

     

    In the 1960’s and ‘70s, Simpson worked as Director of Cinematography for KVIE, Channel 6 as a writer/producer/director/cinematographer/film editor/music composer/voice. He created eleven films which were televised nationally through NET, ETS, and PBS, and which were awarded grants from National Endowment for the Arts, Reader’s Digest Awards, Corporation for Public Broadcasting and NET.

     

    During this period, Simpson was also employed as a cinematographer for the Peabody/Emmy award-winning BBC TV series, AMERICA (with Alistair Cooke) and the BBC/Time Life CHRONICLE series.

     

    In 1977, his book OOTI, A Maidu Legacy was published by Celestial Arts. As anthropologist, photographer and writer, Simpson tells the story of the Maidu creation myth with photographs of Lizzie Enos, an elder tribal historian, preparing the stable acorn mush and bread. The powerful photographs and history have been reproduced and recorded widely.

     

    Richard Simpson’s photographs have appeared in magazines, books, art galleries, and museums. He is in the permanents collections of Oakland Art Museum, California State Archives and Indian Museum, and several universities.

     

    From 1980 to the present, Simpson works as a freelance photographer, writer, filmmakers, and sculptor residing in Northern California.

    Interview Notes: Richard Simpson's Bob Dylan Photographs, Memorial Auditorium, 1964

    As the still photographer, I had come to this film shoot being specifically interested at the time in the natural reactions of the face uninhibited by staging and direction, and how such an otherwise inactive plane related to the “Decisive Moment”, if at all. The answer for me was immediate, Dylan’s face seeming as open and un-posed as an Ansel Adams terrain, which changing subtleties of expression as unpredictable, quick and fleeting as an insect in flight.

     

    Richard Simpson

    Dylan’s mood and cigarette smoke swirls about him and us like ropes pulling us in together even tighter. We are seated in a small, drab, pale yellow room high above the concert stage from which Dylan has just left (41 years ago, come October 28, 2005) immediately following his first concert ever in the town of Sacramento. From the high balcony, not far from the room in which we now sit, I had only minutes before looked down to watch Dylan, spot lit upon the stage below—standing along, on spindly legs, and doing his songs. Though he seemed as fragile as an insect caught in that circle of light, Dylan’s songs were etched with power: a voice of conviction and urgent words echoing out over the darkened empty seats and into the black recesses of the cavernous Memorial Auditorium.Dylan’s mood and cigarette smoke swirls about him and us like ropes pulling us in together even tighter. We are seated in a small, drab, pale yellow room high above the concert stage from which Dylan has just left (41 years ago, come October 28, 2005) immediately following his first concert ever in the town of Sacramento. From the high balcony, not far from the room in which we now sit, I had only minutes before looked down to watch Dylan, spot lit upon the stage below—standing along, on spindly legs, and doing his songs. Though he seemed as fragile as an insect caught in that circle of light, Dylan’s songs were etched with power: a voice of conviction and urgent words echoing out over the darkened empty seats and into the black recesses of the cavernous Memorial Auditorium.

     

    THE SACRAMENTO BEE’s art critic Bill Glackin had written two days later: “Something around 1,000 showed up.”

    A most generous estimate since my recollection has Dylan singing his heart out to a very tiny crowd of no more than 300 standing fans, circled in and bellied-up to the stage-----a one night stand in a not-yet-so-hip for Dylan—town; next stop San Mateo; after that, going on up to Fort Bragg; Dylan’s first sojourn into the sticks of California.

     

    But the starkness of an empty house had obviously held no power to dismay, for Dylan along with his body guard Bobby Neuwirth, arrived from the concert below charged with energy and humor, greeting the setting up of lights, mikes and film camera etc. for the planned local KXTV television interview with jokes and laughter; remaining at ease and in good spirits throughout the entire interview and its barrage of: “We’re here with BOB DYLAAAN,” America’s New Voice For Freedom and Individuality in Folk Music, of Woody Guthrie questions, Barry Goldwater jokes, concerns over income taxes “a la” Joan Baez, etc.

     

    And though Dylan characteristically and deftly fielded all these questions, one answer did in fact break the surface. The question pertained to Dylan’s own song writing, and asked: “Do you consider the music you do or the lyrics that are in the music, the most important? What do you concentrate on the most?”

     

    Dylan answered with a chuckle: “Well, I concentrate on really----really somewhere between those two things. The lyrics----the lyrics, they are just a vehicle. The guitar is just a vehicle for the lyrics, I would think. A lot of lyrics can’t be driven anywhere so they just don’t ever get in the car to be driven. That’s about all I can think of…

     

    (Interviewer): What do you think about commercialism of folk music? Do you think it’s a good thin, or do you think…

     

    (Dylan): I think it’s wonderful. I’m one hundred percent in favor of commercialism!

     

    (Interviewer): Do you think that this has helped folk music by bringing it to the public eye so they can buy it then, and that therefore folk music has become a stronger art form----or do you think that it has been hurt by commercialism in any way at all?

     

    (Dylan): Uh, I don’t think anything is really hurt by anything, you know, if people…

     

    (Bobby Neuwirth): It can’t be hurt!

     

    (Dylan): It can’t be hurt, right. It can be uh, (chuckle)----It can be slapped (chuckle). But you know, it can be uh, well you know, it can be dragged around a little bit, but I don’t see how it (commercialism) could possibly hurt it.

     

    (Here the interviewer {Dick Cruiser, an accomplished folk singer himself who plays the twelve string guitar} mentions Dylan’s songs as controversial social commentary, Dylan taking a liberal stand in his belief that human rights and civil liberties----asking Dylan: “Don’t you try to define these things in your lyrics?”)

     

    (Dylan): I believe in liberalizing and human rights (chuckle), whatever they are. No, I don’t think I try to define it.

     

    (Interviewer): You just comment in other words, on what you feel perhaps is wrong or unfair or---

     

    (Dylan): Well, I just make a picture, you know, of what’s there. If it’s there, you know, if you want to call it human rights, well you can call it human rights I guess. But, I just comment on what’s there.

     

    (Interviewer): In other words then----you’re telling a story and this is the essence of folk music to you, or----do you think you can create any good by telling in the story that people should be equalized for instance, just in human rights?

     

    (Bobby Neuwirth): People gotta make up their own mind!

     

    (Dylan): Yea.

     

    (Interviewer): You wouldn’t try to make up their own mind for them, you just talk about it.

     

    (Bobby Neuwirth): No—no.

     

    (Dylan): For me to make up their minds---- I couldn’t do that; I would have to live their life. If I were to make up their mind, and you know, I would have to lead them somewhere----which I can’t. The world is small enough as it is, you know. I can’t uh,-------BARBARA SAILS!

     

    A commotion at the door. A young woman bursts into the room brandishing white chrysanthemums clutched in her hand----a local girl from Davis.

     

    “Come in!---sit down----you’re on Television!” calls out Dylan, seemingly pleased with the interruption.

     

    Momentary confusion and shifting of position.

     

    (Interviewer): Hello Barbara, I think we’ve met in Davis. What is your name?

     

    (Girl): Barbara. Barbara Madell.

     

    (Interviewer): You said it was Sails.

     

    (Girl): Well, Barbara Sails-Madell----hyphenated.

     

    (Interviewer): Did you ever write a song about Barbara, Bob?

     

    (Dylan): Huh?

     

    (Interviewer): Did you ever write a song about Barbara?

     

    (Dylan): Barbara? Lot’a Barbaras-----she was uh-----

     

    Barbara’s hurricane entrance had hit shore and come inland. The interview stalls, flounders and fades to its inevitable end. And suddenly, Dylan with his small and happy entourage in tow, takes flight from the tiny yellow room-----leaving us behind as he had come in, laughing, on his way to immortality.

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    Phone

    (530)753-2164